COLLABORATION METHODS

How to agree on rules for working together in a project or team
.

1. Team Rules

Discover and map out group members' experience and skill sets.

2. Knowledge and Expertise Map

Discover each group member's goals, ambitions, and expectations.

3. Expectations

Alternate between opposite states of mind
 and activities to fuel the 
creative process.

4. Do The Opposite

Use your body, release your
 mind, and boost your energy!

5. Move

With Flow Writing, ”pour” out your thoughts to brainstorm or solve problems.

6. Flow Writing

FRAMING METHODS

Transform problems 
into challenges and solutions by asking “How might we….”

7. Challenge Framing

Identify the information and inspiration needed for a challenge.

8. Fact and Inspiration Finding

Make a shared ‘To Do’ list to help you think, plan, structure and prioritise.

9. The 'To Do' List

Show and Tell to express thoughts,
 ideate and experiment.

10. Show and Tell

Discuss and
 select the most important aspects or criteria
 for a specific project.

11. Success Criteria Grid

Evaluate and narrow the choices when faced with many different ideas.

12. Telescoping

COMMUNICATION METHODS

Build a shared understanding of
 tasks and destination.

Keep a Log Book to collect ideas, boost memory and track your process.

Display collected project materials to get an overview and understanding.

Generate energetic and short presentation 
sessions.

16. Pecha Kucha

Present your idea, project or research in a short, dynamic and interesting way.

17. Pitching

Use storytelling to help listeners better process and remember information.

18. Storytelling

1. Team Rules

Team Rules is a method for agreeing on a set of rules for how to work together and behave 
towards one another during a project or team
work. This is important for the team in order
 to work properly and avoid discussions and 
conflict.

2. Knowledge and Expertise Map

Every member of a group has different expe
riences and skill sets. This method aims 
to discover what they are, and map them 
out for all to see. In this way they might be put 
to better use in the classroom and in the project at 
hand. This method is also a convenient way to
 come to know one another in a group.

3. Expectations

Different people might have different ambitions, 
expectations and goals. Sharing the expectations of each individual involved in a project,
 a teamwork or in a class makes it easier to
 work together. It helps to avoid misunderstand
ings and creates common goals for the whole
 team.

4. Do The Opposite

Alternating between opposite states of mind
 and activities is beneficial for moving the 
creative process along. This method is useful
 for creating self-awareness of these different
 states of mind and activities, and trying to switch
 between them to create a more dynamic and
 creative process.

5. Move

Sometimes it is a bad idea to keep on doing
 what you are doing: sitting around the same
 table in the same room, or in front of a computer, digging yourself into a hole by researching on and on, arguing about the same issue 
or trying desperately to come up with an idea 
in the same manner. This is why you need to
 break away from the chair and the table and
 do things in a different way by using your body. You can go for a walk or a short intense run, or
 go and feed the ducks in a nearby park! OR 
put on some music and do stretching exercises
 or dance together. Use your body, release your
 minds and boost your energy!

6. Flow Writing

Flow Writing is an excellent method at any time 
in a process, as it gives your brain a break
 where you just ”pour” your thoughts out on
 paper for a short while without judging or eva
luating the content. It can be used to give voice 
to problems or conflicts you might experience 
in the team, or to formulate questions about the
 project. It is also useful for brainstorming, to get
 ideas for a challenge, or to find a new approach 
to a challenge if you feel that you are stuck.

7. Challenge Framing

This method is about transforming problems 
into challenges by asking “How might we….” This is a helpful approach to problem-solving 
because rather than struggling with difficult 
problems, it is easier and more fun to break a
 complicated problem down and deal with interesting challenges that relate to the problem. 
Challenge Framing must be done both at the start of a project and regularly as the project
 progresses, as formulating, discussing and re-
formulating the challenge makes the project and 
the objectives clear for everybody!

8. Fact and Inspiration Finding

Before doing research about a challenge, this method is a way of discussing and identifying what kinds of information and inspiration might be needed to develop a solution to a challenge, deal with a project or study a specific challenge.

9. The 'To Do' List

Making a ‘To Do’ list is a way of avoiding the
 overwhelming sensation of having lots of things 
to do by creating a visual, shared overview of
 things. It makes you think through the decisions 
and actions needed, and also help you structure and prioritise them. The list can serve as a shared memory and communication tool in a
 group, and should be put up on a wall and be a
 shared visual list at all times.

10. Show and Tell

The Show and Tell method allows individuals
 some personal space to express their thoughts,
 ideate and experiment, and then present it back 
to the group. The method can be used at different stages of a process. When giving feedback
, it is important to think carefully of both positive
 and negative aspects of what is being presented, and also be as sincere and constructive 
as possible.

11. Success Criteria Grid

This method focuses on discussing and
 selecting the most important aspects or criteria
 for a specific project, learning experience or
 challenge, providing the pupils and teachers
 with a tool to guide their work and also to eva
luate the process and the end result.

12. Telescoping

This method is useful when you have many options, ideas or possible solutions and you need 
to evaluate and restrict the team’s choices. It is
 a matter of displaying the options, voting individually and giving each person an opportunity
 to explain and argue in favour of their preferences before making a common and informed
 choice.

13. Road Map

When working together with other people it is 
important to have a shared understanding of
 what you are doing and where you are heading.
 One thing that can help you achieve this is
 creating a visual, shared illustration of the road
 you are on, which methods you will use, when
 you will do things, and for how long: A road
map.

14. Log Book

A Log Book can be either a physical notebook with blank pages, or a digital log. The
 important thing is that is must be easily accessible and be able to include sketches, pictures 
and notes or text. Most of us have a short-term
 memory, and keeping a log book, noting down 
interesting ideas or collecting pictures and
 sketching ideas is a great memory booster and
 process tracker!

15. Data Wall

The Data Wall is a method of obtaining an overview and an understanding of different complex
 information by collecting and displaying col
lected photos, notes and objects relevant to a
 project. Displaying and sharing information in 
a visual way is a powerful tool because dis
playing information so it is visible and can be 
moved around enables you to discover relationships, patterns and hierarchies that are other
wise not immediately apparent.

16. Pecha Kucha

Pecha Kucha – Japanese for “chit-chat” – is a
 method of presentation where both the amount 
of material and the time is heavily restricted. This forces the presenter(s) to clarify their
 thoughts and aims, and formulate and present
 their findings in a precise and clear manner. It
 generates an energetic and short presentation 
session.

17. Pitching

To “pitch” originally means to throw something,
 but it is often used in the meaning: a speech 
or an act that attempts to persuade someone 
to buy or do something. Pitching is a method
 of presenting your idea, project or research insights in a short, dynamic and interesting way.

18. Storytelling

A good story touches you and is more easily
 remembered than just a series of facts. Pupils
 can write stories about things they have developed or learned using storytelling because it 
helps to process and remember information and present information and facts in 
a more engaging manner.

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